Upcoming Events

Mini Calendar

< >
January 2018
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031

Links

VETO Facebook..>

facebook

VETO Twitter...>

twitter

Save Logan River..>

facebook

Stop Energex Destruction..>

facebook

Logan Action Group..>

LOGAN
ACTION

LOCK THE GATE Alliance..>

Lock The Gate

LACA (Logan & Albert Conservation Association)..>

lacafront

Home

VETO is a community organisation committed to preventing ENERGEX from turning the already fragile Logan River valley into a power line easement, clearing 42.5 hectares of Logan koala habitat, and destroying the amenity and property values of local residents.   

Our position on the ENERGEX proposed Loganlea to Jimboomba 110kV powerline is:-

"The FIAR [Energex Final Interim Assessment Report proposal] is in contradiction to key planning and legislative documents, carries out a damaging environmental precedent through incompatible land use and in no way represents best practice in environmental, social and cultural standards expected in Australia in the 21st Century. Where other viable options exist, a project with as many fundamental flaws in policy, application and public opinion should not be considered."
Extract from VETO Submission to Energex FIAR July 2010 (p5)   Read more...> pdf_64  (14.7 MB) verify

boring_machine

sign_dangerovhpowerlines photo-pole3

Boring machine used to create the power pole base [ref FIAR 16-4]. How can this construction be considered low impact ?

Typical 110kV single circuit
concrete power pole

Example of a concrete power pole affected by severe weather (Moranbah 2008), yes these poles can fall over !

This website is intended to provide information for local residents and anyone interested in the issues, especially those who want a better outcome for our community than what is being proposed by Energex.  We need to protect the Logan River bioregional corridor and Koala habitat for current and future generations.

Don't think you can't do anything about it - THAT IS SIMPLY NOT TRUE .....GET INVOLVED TODAY!
  
CONTACT US OR COME TO OUR MEETINGS, THERE IS ALWAYS A WARM WELCOME 
VETO Meetings are held on the 4th Tuesday of each month,  7pm at the Community Hall, 66 Kenny Road, Chambers Flat
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

We Can’t Get in to Restore Supply

Hits: 2174

For over 4 years Energex have chosen not to listen to our community. Energex management are so intent on imposing their proposed second Loganlea to Jimboomba high voltage powerline on our community they have ignored our concerns and advice that the Logan River floodplain is inaccessible during the wet.

This was dramatically demonstrated during the January 2013 floods, when ex-tropical cyclone Oswald came down the east coast delivering high winds and heavy rain. The Logan River rose rapidly to major flood levels, isolating homes in the floodplain. Some homes in Logan and other areas in Queensland and NSW were hit hard with extensive flooding and damage.

For Logan, there were 22,000 homes without electricity supply, with many overhead powerlines brought down by the high winds and fallen trees. However the big issue was access, with main roads including Waterford-Tamborine Road, Mt Lindesay Highway, Camp Cable Road and many local roads cut by flood waters.

Even Energex’s (pre council-amalgamation) Logan River flood hazard zone map (opposite), shows 40% of the proposed powerline route will be inundated by flood waters, with 26% actually in the path of the rapidly flowing Logan River. With Logan City Council's more recent flood modelling now showing river flow rates are 2 to 3 times greater than those estimated by the Energex 2009 WorleyParsons Report(FIAR Appendix E).

Many homes in our area were without power for 4 to 5 days and when asked, when our area could expect to have supply restored, Energex spokesperson Mike Swanston said on radio “We Can’t Get in to Restore Power”.

 

fiar fig9-1h

(click on image to enlarge)

This is what we've been telling Energex for 4 years. Families in our area were isolated, without power and hoping the water wouldn’t reach their homes. But people in our community are resourceful and we didn’t expect Energex crews to risk their safety to restore power.

So the question is, if this proposed second high voltage powerline, which Energex claim is required to deliver reliability for our region, breaks or turns-off during a regular Logan River flood, how do Energex expect to get in to restore power? Clearly Energex's ability to restore powerlines during a flood has not changed since the North Coast floods of August 2007 .

After seeing the destruction of the Jan2011 and Jan2013 floods in Queensland how is it sensible to purposely locate “essential electricity infrastructure” in the Logan River flood hazard zone? Alternatives exist, what’s lacking is Energex’s WILL to explore them with our Council and Community.

jimboomba times 30jan13-cover

Jimboomba Times Front Page 30 January 2013 (click on image to enlarge)

This issue of access, highlighted by the January 2013 flood, undermines Energex’s claim that this second powerline will deliver reliabile supply for our community.

There are many locations where the proposed line and even the existing line could be knocked out during a flood and where access to restore service would be dangerous. Causing extended supply outages for consumers from North McLean to Beaudesert, even when these consumers are not directly affected by the flood.

The Queensland flood experience of January 2011 and now January 2013, demonstrates the need for essential infrastructure to be located away from flood hazard zones, especially when there are alternatives - which there are for this proposed second powerline.

We’ve asked Minister McArdle to call for a full risk assessment of the Energex proposal before it is allowed to proceed.

Surely the adjacent image of the double-B gas tanker recently stranded in floodwaters at Jimboomba, demonstrates the potential for large and dangerous debris to be carried by a flooding Logan River.

Imagine what this could do to a high voltage powerline with 29 concrete poles actually located in and following the Logan River flood hazard zone.